Leaving Hopetown, Again

December 27, 2015

We stayed another night at Tahiti beach because Travis and Mary and the girls liked it there.  We were surrounded by noisy, light-polluting charter catarmarans.  I hated it.

December 28, 2015

We sailed, with Seahorse, south to Lynnyard Cay, where we found our first very nice, remote anchorage in clear, swimming-pool blue waters.  On the sail here the car that holds the mainsail to the boom flew off the end, not for the first time, and the part that keeps it on the boom broke off.  Ryan repaired it.   

On the way here, we caught a fish: a Horse-Eyed Jack.  I made tacos with it.  Very lovely.  We made water today.

Lynnyard Cay is a long, thin island with some pleasant anchorages and a only a few houses.  We anchored off a small beach that had a white picnic table and some plywood tables nailed into trees, also a broken-down platform with a ratty mattress on it, exposed to the rain.  We followed a trail from this beach to the ocean side and spent hours walking there.  I found a lot of small sea-sponges that had washed ashore, and made two leis to adorn our dodger.  I also found an interesting salmon-colored, round float with the words, “Rosendahl, Bergen, Norway,” imprinted on it.

I am feeling a little bit better, but still a bit sick to my stomach and weak.

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Some Scenes from the Passage

Photos and videos from our trip down to the Abacos.

Here are a few shots of Sophia from our initial journey down to the Bahamas.  For a description of some exciting times during that passage, check out “The Passage.”  If you’re interested in checking out the boat down below, go to “Sophia Down Below.”

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Sophia, a 36-foot Sabre, off the coast of North Carolina, the beginning of our passage down to Abaco.

Here’s a video I shot on the second day of the passage:

 

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Donny H., who crewed on Seahorse and helped all of us immensely, pours out the first celebratory glass of champage!  We made it!
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At Marsh Harbor, Abaco.

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Travis, Skipper of Seahorse, and Ryan, Skipper of Sophia, conferring about the next destination.

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Seahorse, in the foreground, and Sophia, in the distance, at Hopetown.

 

Postscript on “The Passage”

Ryan read my description of our passage–my first, his sixth or seventh–and said I way over exaggerated the drama.  “But I told a good story!” I protested.   Here is what he has to say about it:

There is nothing about this boat that is poorly maintained or ill-equipped. Things do happen when out sailing — even to well found vessels. Anyone who thinks otherwise is not realistic. This was one of the best passages I have ever done. The weather was mostly good and we sailed practically the whole thing on one tack. It got a little windy at times but the boat handled it beautifully. It was a great passage.

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Mary keeps threatening to send me photos of our boat, Sophia (a Sabre 36) via email.  I think she’s having too much fun back in Brevard to get round to it.  No worries. I’ll keep posting pictures of her Bruce Roberts 43, Seahorse, in the Sargasso Sea!

 

 

P.S.  I also think it was a great passage.

Seahorse: Mary, Travis, and Donny

One of the many good things about cruising is the opportunity to meet and make new friends.  As our readers know already, we made the passage to the Abacos with Seahorse, a 43-foot Bruce Roberts.  The boat is beautiful, like its people.  Mary and Travis brought their good friend,  Donny, who also happens to be the broker who helped them find and buy their vessel.  Seahorse’s layout is complete different from ours, much more spacious but also more compartmentalized.  Sophia was built for occasional short journeys, weekend cruises, while Seahorse was designed as a liveaboard cruiser, sturdy enough to travel anywhere on the planet.

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Seahorse in the Gulf Stream
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Travis and Mary
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Seahorse at Sunset in the Sargasso Sea

I’m not complaining about our boat, not at all.  Sophia is just the right size, and the absolute perfect craft for our needs.  She reminds me of the Erikson 39 I grew up on in Santa Barbara.  We’re very happy.

But we’re especially pleased to have made these new friends, who are so knowledgeable about all manner of things, and friendly and good-natured.  All three of them are outdoorsy people (as you might expect among those who are up for a 500 mile journey on the Atlantic Ocean, 250 or more miles out to sea), and quite athletic.

Today Ryan and I even got up on the Lyra, an arial hoop that hangs from the spinnaker pole.  You get up into it and do acrobatic things, and you feel like you’re ten years old again, playing on the monkey bars.  And if you fall, no problem!  You drop into the water!!!